The Puritans (A Webquest)

Introduction: As the map below indicates, the Puritans had an enormous influence on the development of New England, including Connecticut. The purpose of this Webquest is for you to learn about these influential settlers and to practice your research, cooperative, and oral presentation skills.

Puritan Trade Routes

The Task: You will work with a group of four or five students using the web to locate and record the answers to ten questions about the Puritans. Then, you will prepare a short oral presentation on two of the questions.

The Process:

1. Meet with your group members.

2. Write each of the following questions on a separate index card:

  • Why did the Puritans come to the “New World”?
  • What were the religious beliefs of the Puritans and how did they influence their communities?
  • What is the difference between a Pilgrim and a Puritan?
  • Who was the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and what are important facts about his life?
  • What did John Winthrop mean by a “city upon a hill”?
  • What did the Puritans do for fun?
  • How did the Puritans get along with the Native Americans?
  • What happened to Anne Hutchinson?
  • What happened to Roger Williams?
  • How tolerant were the Puritans of people who had different ideas from them?

3. Divvy the questions up among group members. Remember, you don’t know which questions you will be required to present; all group members must do quality work! Also, be kind to your fellow group members; if you find information that answers someone else’s question, let them know! Some sites will partly answer several questions. When sites are primarily focused on one question, I have tried to make that evident in the title.

4. As you research, record the facts you discover about your questions on the appropriate card(s).

5. When each group member has located the answer to his/her questions, reconvene as a group and have members share information. All members of the group are responsible for knowing the answers to the questions.

6. See me to find out which questions you will present.

7. Prepare a short oral presentation of information on the two questions. Each member of the group should participate in the presentation.

Resources: TIP! Use the find command (hold down the control button, hit the “f” key, and type a word) to help you locate useful information in a document quickly. For example, if you are looking for information about Roger Williams, type “Williams.” The word will be highlighted where it appears in the document. Or, if you locate a document that is not entirely about the Puritans, you can type “Puritans” to locate the section in which they appear.

Using a search engine, you may want to type keywords such as Hutchinson, Roger Williams, and John Winthrop. I like http://www.google.com/

Evaluation:

Presentations will be graded using the following criteria:

Beginning

Beginning oral presentations involve one or two members of the group. The clarity with which group members speak is poor and members are often difficult to hear; pacing is very poor. Members do not emphasize important words and usually speak in a monotone. Group members exhibit very little poise and rarely make eye contact with the audience. The presentation frequently contains wording from the sources provided. The information is rarely clear, accurate, or thorough; the group is able to answer few questions with ease.

Developing

Developing oral presentations involve only some members of the group. The clarity with which group members speak is inconsistent and members are sometimes difficult to hear; pacing is poor. Members emphasize few important words and often speak in a monotone. Group members exhibit little poise and occasionally make eye contact with the audience. The presentation often contains wording from the sources provided. The information is somewhat clear, accurate and thorough; the group is able to answer some questions with ease.

Accomplished

Accomplished oral presentations involve most members of the group. Group members speak clearly and are loud enough to be heard by the audience most of the time; pacing may vary. Members emphasize some important words and rarely speak in a monotone. Each group member exhibits some poise and usually sustains eye contact with the audience. The presentation is usually in students’ own words. The information is usually clear, accurate, and thorough; the group is able to answer most questions with ease.

Exemplary

Exemplary oral presentations involve each member of the group. Group members consistently speak clearly and are loud enough to be heard by the audience; pacing is neither too fast nor too slow. Members emphasize important words and avoid speaking in a monotone. Each group member exhibits much poise and consistently sustains eye contact with the audience. The presentation is in students’ own words. The information is very clear, accurate, and thorough; the group is able to answer questions with ease.

Conclusion: You now have a good overview of the Puritans and have had the opportunity to practice some of the skills emphasized in this first unit. Next, we will examine how tensions in a Puritan community boiled over and resulted in the Salem witch trials.

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  • dan

    some of the links have expired which makes this webquest harder to accomplish. however, its still pretty useful

  • Jessie

    its really fun

  • jessie

    sadly though  some sites r down so that didnt help me with answering the ?’s

  • http://www.chrismasters.com Chris Masters

    hi i’m Chris Masters i liked your program! so please don’t erase my comments please thank you – Chris Masters